Win a Kindle Fire – Tell Us About Your Best Law Professor

We have hopefully all had that classroom experience where a Professor has impacted our education and even our lives with their talent or passion for teaching. Tell us about your best Law Professor. Who made you love the law, inspired you to succeed, helped you to finally comprehend a difficult course, etc?

Tell us your first name, law school and the name of the course the professor taught. Exclude your Professor’s name, we don’t want to embarrass anyone. When you reply to this post with your answer you will be assigned 3 entries into our Kindle Fire drawing. If you win, you will also be able to choose two Wolters Kluwer Law & Business Study Aids from our list of available titles. They will come pre-loaded on your Kindle.

When you reply to this blog post, you will also receive drawing entries for doing any of the following:

  • Subcribe to this blog (= 2 entries in our drawing)
  • Follow @lawMs17 (=2 entries in our drawing)
  • ReTweet this contest post from the @lawMs17 Twitter account (=2 entries in our drawing)
  • Post a YouTube video on this topic and send us a link to studentreps@wolterskluwer.com (=5 entries in our drawing)
  • Already following our blog and Tweets? (= automatic 2 entries in our drawing)

We will use the email from the blog reply to contact our winner. Entries accepted through February 17, 2012

About Aspen Publisher's Study Aids from Wolters Kluwer Law & Business

Aspen Publishers is a leading information provider for attorneys, business professionals and law students. Written by preeminent authorities, Aspen products offer analytical and practical information in a range of specialty practice areas from securities law and intellectual property to mergers and acquisitions and pension/benefits. Aspen’s trusted legal education resources provide professors and students with high-quality, up-to-date and effective resources for successful instruction and study in all areas of the law.
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40 Responses to Win a Kindle Fire – Tell Us About Your Best Law Professor

  1. Travis Helm says:

    Travis
    University of Wyoming
    Legislation

    With legs crossed like the Buddha, sitting atop a table, he lectures with a smile. Always pausing to say “bless you” when someone sneezes. Despite such a kind and cordial manner this guy knows his stuff! Although the course was titled Legislation it was a great deal more, cannons of statutory interpretation, explaining how and why a brief should be fashioned, how to read decisions. Other professors had mentioned these but he explained them in a manner far superior to any other I have encountered at this school . Not only is he engaging and knowledgeable… he actually stays on schedule of the syllabus, he seems to have a better comprehension of what is a realistic goal for each class and for the semester as a whole.

  2. Cameron W. Geeting says:

    Cameron W. Geeting
    University of Wyoming College of Law
    Torts II

    This professor exemplifies what I look for in an educator. His attitude is upbeat and energetic. From the first to the last minute of class, he never seems disinterested or disengaged. His style of the Socratic method is assertive, but unthreatening. He insists you answer, but in a way that makes you want to rise to the challenge rather than shrink. His crisp coverage of the elements of a particular rule makes things clear and understandable, and his supposedly hypothetical examples in class often turn out to be real cases – even the most outlandish ones. He is approachable and friendly, while at the same time demonstrating a deep understanding of Torts. I will miss this class and hope to take more from this professor.

  3. Nora says:

    Nora
    University of Wyoming
    Civil PreTrial
    This professor took on the challenge of teaching a basically four credit course in a two credit timeframe. He spent just about every weekend reading and correcting all of our primitive attempts to draft all the legal documents involved in bringing a civil suit to trial. His comment were always helpful, appropriate and very comprehensive. He was always available for consultation and encouragement. In a school where there are many dedicated professors, this professor stood out to me this past semester.

  4. Brian Benight says:

    Brian Benight
    University of Wyoming
    1L Property I & II

    He played Simpson clips to illustrate various topics and ethical issues. It was a nice break from the 1L grind.

  5. Jordan Poling says:

    Jordan Poling
    The University of Akron School of Law
    Wills, Trusts, & Estates I

    Coming into the class all I heard was that the final exam was brutal and that the professor cold called a lot. I also thought I would have little interest in the subject, but it was a bar course so I decided to take it anyway. I was really surprised at the enthusiasm and energy the professor had in teaching the subject. He was able to take the material and make it very interesting in addition to keeping the whole class engaged. He had a very good sense of humor about topics in the course and managed to reinforce core knowledge with frequent review that never got boring. By the end of the semester I did a complete 180 on the area of law and have since decided that I have a strong interest in pursuing estate work in my future legal career. I also signed up for two more classes taught by the professor the following semester.

  6. Heather says:

    Texas Tech
    Civil Procedure

    My professor used the Lion King song hakuna matata to explain the concept of res judicta. Just imagine a relatively stern professor dancing around the front of the classroom to a Disney song.

  7. Hasina Lewis says:

    My Legal Writing professor my 1L made a significant impact of my life. As usual, I came to law school with the assumption that I knew how to write and that I was going to Ace my legal writing course just as I had with writing courses in college. However, after my first semester I realized that I did not know how to write at ALL!! Starting second semester I was determined to ace the my legal writing class. The first thing I told my professor was that I was going to conquer her class, and that is exactly what I did. Throughout the semester this professor was so nice and helpful and always had an open door policy. She told the class that she would look over our drafts at any time and she truly did. She gave me positive feedback and constructive criticism over the semester and I saw my writing improve tremendously. She would always encourage me and she could tell that I was harder on myself than anyone else. I really appreciate her love and excitement for her craft and it truly inspired me to achieve more.

  8. Deven says:

    Name: Deven
    School: Duke Law (transfer)
    Course: Civil Procedure I
    This is my favorite professor because he taught me something that should be obvious, but that the obscurity of law school pedagogy can cause even the most experienced and diligent student to forget. He was enthusiastic about Civil Procedure, diligent about using memorable cases to demonstrate the topics and taught the class how each rule fit together. But what he taught me that should be obvious is to make sure you understand what you are learning. He would say “tell me what Rule X means as if you were explaining it to your 12 year old little sister.” In an environment where there is only one exam at the end it is critical to try to gauge your understanding as the semester progresses and this is a perfect way. Even now as a 2L I think about something I am learning and if I feel like I couldn’t explain it to that fictitious 12 year old I know I need to work on the subject more. This also helps me when I am deciding which classes I need study aids for and what type of study aid I need. I reach for an E & E when I think I can’t explain it to a 12 year old. When I think I am getting the hang of a concept I pull out the law in a flash cards on the subject and test my knowledge. This concept has also been helpful in my trial practice class. As I prepare openings, closings and witness examinations I think about jurors and how I need to explain my theory of the case to them to guarantee that they understand.

  9. Jen says:

    Jen
    Elon University School of Law
    Business Associations

    I believe that an excellent Professor is one that can make you care about a topic that you have absolutely no interest in. Going into Business Associations I thought I would be lucky to just get through with a decent grade and didn’t hope to take anything away from the class. The Professor was so excited about this subject that his energy was infectious. While BA is a dry topic he found ways to spice it up with corporate intrigue, dubious mergers and businesses behaving badly. Ultimately I walked away from this class with a new found respect for the subject, a thorough understanding and my best grade yet in school. This professor incorporated videos, real life examples, a detailed breakdown of the issues and class speakers. He even managed to have a conference call for our class from one of the defendants in our casebook. His dedication to this class made all the difference in my participation and understanding.

  10. D. Hernandez says:

    Denise
    Texas Tech Univeristy School of Law
    Income Taxation

    The very name of the course would nauseate any student, but this professor turned a frightening course into an unbelievably enjoyable experience. He used comedy to break down the course material and applied humorous current events to explain old case law. I truly enjoyed his teaching style and I plan on taking as many of his classes as possible.

  11. Tyler says:

    Tyler Benting
    Texas Tech University School of Law
    Wills & Trusts

    Our professor is brilliant. He explained applicable Texas law in a way that was simple and clear – can’t say that about all the statutes. I would take any class with this prof again (and plan to).

  12. Jay Batman says:

    Jay Batman
    Texas Tech University School of Law
    Contracts, Conflict of Laws, Federal Courts

    Hurricane Wild Bill, the sartorially resplendent professor replete with bow tie, is a legend of jurisprudence. In Contracts, this man gave us the grounding we needed in UCC 2-212. The analyses were succinct, to the point, and he instilled in us the capacity to apply what we’d learned to virtually any fact pattern. His genius lies in his point by point analysis template. It’s simple to understand, and it gives you an easy to follow method for every question you face in the subjects he teaches. With this professor, complicated legal questions become simplified and streamlined, and his dry wit in class is an absolute delight.

    “Now…when you look at the notes from the Constitutional Convention…you’ll see this three letter abbreviation throughout…there are a lot of these…WTFs. Do you see why that is in relation to Article III courts?”

    He has an understanding of when the class is lost, and his finger is always on the pulse. He knows how to resuscitate the class with offbeat humor:

    “Have I ever told you how to make the perfect…margarita?”

    If you ever talk to him one on one, what stands out is that he tells you only what is relevant to an understanding of the topic at hand, and he is an expert on whatever it is he is talking about. Because of this, our Professor is respected.

  13. John Langner says:

    John Langner
    Texas Tech University
    Federal Civil Procedure

    This professor was truly a terror from the beginning. He used the Socratic method exclusively and would call on one student per class, grilling them relentlessly over the many details of civil procedure each case was meant to illustrate. This was one class where even the gunners were afraid to volunteer because he really went that in depth almost every day. Needless to say his class was not always the funnest of experiences, but I made a great grade in Civil Procedure and don’t really feel I’ve learned another subject as well since his class. He was a TRUE classical Law Professor, the type that makes kids want to avoid law school. For me that is what made him so great. He seems to be a dying breed.

  14. Karla Valles says:

    Karla
    Texas Tech University School of Law
    Property

    My professor was very funny and broke down tough legal concepts very nicely. I enjoyed coming to class every day; and, for the first time, I enjoyed law school.

  15. Samm Lind says:

    Samm
    University of Wyoming
    Defense Clinic-Criminal Law

    This professor is a constant example in both life and in the law. As the supervising professor to a law school clinic that provides really the only means to post-conviction relief in the state, she puts in an incredible amount of time on dozens of cases. In addition to managing all of these cases, she also manages all of the 3L students working under license. I never dreamed of doing criminal defense work but I thought I would try it and in doing so I have encountered the biggest hurdles in my life while working on cases. Criminal defense work can seem impossibly overwhelming but she has allowed me to feel upset and at the same time teach me to pick myself up and try again. She truly allows the 3L students who work in the clinic to take the lead. The fine line she walks between supervising and allowing the students to shine should be commended.

    Not only has she motivated to continue improving my writing, engrained into my head the difference between specific and general intent — she has taught me what it means to be a good attorney. I have learned from her example to always try and apply the golden rule to both my clients and attorneys in my clinical work. She is a constant reminder to try and do my best and treat others with respect. Even when frustration creeps up on me, she has taught me to champion on and fight the good fight.

    I would count myself lucky to model my career after her.

  16. Daniel Minardi says:

    Daniel
    West Virginia University
    Civil Procedure

    Very enthusiastic and inspiring professor who made sure we always understood the importance of substance over form.

  17. Crystal says:

    Crystal
    Elon University
    Course: Legal Writing

    I’ve never been one to enjoy writing, but this professor made me want to be a better writer. He helped me so much that I actually enjoy legal writing!

  18. mawilson58 says:

    Mark
    Elon University School of Law
    Criminal Law

    This professor was able to facilitate classroom discussion better than any professor I have ever had. This professor can be a little unforgiving but because of that I learned more in this course than any other first year course.

  19. Travis Koch says:

    Name: Travis
    University of Wyoming
    Administrative Law

    This guy brings it everyday and makes class fun.

  20. Casey Frome says:

    Whats better than a twenty something looking professor that teaches subjects from Torts to International business very well with a tropical island internship/job background. Who could ask for more?

  21. Marlene says:

    Name: Marlene
    School: University of Wyoming
    Professor: Property I
    This Professor is a delight among the usual bunch. This course requires thorough understanding of the material and he makes you think about the cases and the policies behind it as well as a thorough rule application analysis. However, once you do you realize that you have mastered the material. I think this is extremely helpful in the future where as a practicing attorney there will be times when you have to research and apply new material.
    In addition, he makes the subject fun and entertaining.

  22. Rik says:

    Rik
    UNLV-Boyd
    Constitutional Law

    This was a tough decision. Quite a few of my professors could qualify as my “best.” I chose my ConLaw professor because she taught me one of the best lessons of law school – what it means to be a lawyer.

    “Think like a lawyer” has become a cliche. And telling me that class discussions will be critical when working for a law firm partner doesn’t resonate either. I didn’t enter law school to become the ideal associate; I came to learn to be a lawyer.

    The professor I’m thinking of challenged our class in the usual ConLaw topics: civil rights, checks and balances, etc. But more importantly, she regularly reminded us (i.e. beat it through my skull) that lawyers have the skill to be difference-makers in society – that our education isn’t a job but a profession that carries responsibilities not only to our clients but our community, state, and nation as well.

    I’m not sure I “love the law” yet. But I am beginning to recognize the gravitas of being a lawyer and, as a result, feel all the more motivated to prepare myself.

  23. Stacia says:

    This professor is a top notch educator. He is always well read, and brings plenty of practical experience to the classroom. He manages to make Trusts and Estates as well as Income Taxation make sense, which is no small feat. In addition, he is one of the few professors that I know personally reads each evaluation and adjusts his course accordingly.

  24. Thomas Balmat says:

    University of Wyoming
    Torts I

    As a new law student, I was very lucky to have had this professor teach Torts to our class. He was engaging and passionate with the material, and made sure we understood the important “elements” from each case. It was so rewarding throughout the semester to be routinely surprised at just how much he had forced us to learn, yet it all seemed pain free and interesting. This professor taught law the way it was meant to be taught, with engaging stories, repetition, and clear expectations!

  25. CB says:

    University of Arizona
    Arizona Civil Procedure

    The professor managed to make an ordinarily dry subject riveting! His attention to student feedback in prior years was obvious and his desire to make the subject fun was evident. The professor was super sweet and enjoyed teaching, just as much as he enjoyed mentoring us.

  26. Carly Anderson says:

    Carly Anderson
    University of Wyoming
    Torts I

    This professor was absolutely amazing and an expert in the Torts field. I learned so much from him in this class and am so glad I had the opportunity to have him as a professor for one of his final years of teaching.

  27. Kelby says:

    This teacher told students the truth about the legal profession. He was successful before he became a professor and was able to bring distinguished successful business men and women into class because of his past accomplishments outside academia. This teacher provided reliable real world situations and expected us to solve them weekly. The ability to receive feedback about our work product in a real world setting was invaluable.

  28. sus says:

    Professor Jarod Gonzales
    Texas Tech

    My professor has the unique mix of brilliance and kindness. He takes difficult concepts and makes them manageable. He is excellent at giving real-world examples of complex procedural issues. This professor is also very helpful to his students; he has an open door policy and loves to see students get excited about the material!

  29. Jill says:

    Jill
    Charlotte School of Law
    Civil Procedures

    Civil Procedures could easily be one of the most boring classes in the 1L line up, but Professor X makes it interesting. When I first found out what civil procedures entailed, I had visions of the movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” with everyone half asleep and the teacher in the front, monotone asking if anyone knew the answer. My class is anything but that scenario. The teacher always has some anecdote to help us remember what’s going on and adds energy to the class by making us laugh with comments such as “If it smells like a Twiqbal and walks like a Twiqbal…”

  30. Rives says:

    Rives
    University of Wyoming
    Administrative

    This individual is an ambitious and creative professor in a subject that is and can be less than exhilarating. Using real life examples and quirky humor allowed me to believe that I could leave the education setting and practice in this area with no learning curve.

  31. Lindsey Krause says:

    Lindsey
    University of Wyoming
    Torts

    A teacher that kept you engaged throughout the semester and made sure that you knew everything he expected you to when you went into an examination. This man taught the whole semester without ever referencing a single note..a legend!

  32. Galen McMahan says:

    Our 1L teacher emphasized real understanding, and the principles behind the rules, as opposed to memorization. He also took entertaining and much needed breaks, such as the time he categorized various names from the class to make creative titles for law firms. He knows the law in and out, and is also a social philosopher. An inspiration to me, and likely many others

  33. Emily Lipkin says:

    Emily Lipkin
    University of Wyoming
    Torts

    I will never forget what this professor told us on the last class before finals. He said that, while he might not be good at math, according to his calculations, 90% of law students didn’t finish in the top 10% of their classes and they got along just fine, which was a welcome releif from the professor who just finished telling us all that if we weren’t in the top 10% we would end up living in a trailor down by the river.

  34. C. Auster says:

    Cheryl Auster
    St. Mary’s University, San Antonio
    1L Contracts

    The first day of class we watched the movie “The Insider” with Russel Crowe, not only was it a unique way to start off the first class of my 1L year, but it immediately allowed me to see, without being told, that contracts are around us everywhere. Professor X is passionate about the subject and utilized current events and movies to illustrate the complex issues of contracts. During the second part of the class he would routinely give us a fact pattern (usually from old exams) and have students stand in the shoes of either party with a third acting a a judge. This made class engaging in a way far superior to Socratic method. Not only did I walk away from the class knowing a great deal about contracts but it helped shape my legal ambitions and changed my habits as a consumer and moviegoer.

  35. jesssuccess says:

    Jessica McLaurin
    University of Mississippi
    Land Finance
    An unbelievable mentor dropped from the heavens! She would say she’s a dirt girl. But if you ever want a professor to give you the real practical side of practicing real estate, she is the professor for you. She expects you to know how and know what to do when someone comes into your office 2 days after you have passed the bar and have set up your own solo practice. She is also about to go a step further with me in preparing contracts in Spanish since she practiced on the Texas and Mexico border for many many years.
    #law school excitement

  36. Jake Skog says:

    Jake Skog
    University of Wyoming
    Property, Land Use, Real Estate Finance

    A quirky person with special love for animated television, this professor always kept me engaged in a subject area that, for many, is especially difficult.

  37. Jeremy Gross says:

    Jeremy Gross
    University of Wyoming
    Torts

    There are few words that can describe the awe this man creates in the people of Wyoming. He is revered in the state as being the leading ethics attorney, frequently publishes articles in the state bar magazine, and runs the Legal Services clinic on top of all his other responsibilities. The man never brings a single note or book to class, because he has nearly every letter committed to memory. He goes well out of his way to make sure that each student has a unique learning experience, yet still drives the material home in a way that makes sense. He has served over 20 years here at the law school but sadly will be retiring shortly. I don’t know how anyone will be able to follow in his footsteps.

  38. Jeff says:

    Jeff Meier
    University of Wyoming
    Legal Writing

    I suppose my professor had a bit of an advantage over most; he’s a nationally recognized expert at communicating. So, it is not surprising then that he would be able to effectively communicate the course material to us.

    He spoke very quickly, and spewed forth so much information, all crammed into 50 minutes twice a week. Yet, I easily received and understood all of it because it was so well organized, and presented in such a way that made learning effortless.

    Because he was able to both communicate very quickly AND in a way that I was able to understand, I think I have a significant advantage over classmates from other sections of Legal Writing. He simply covered much more material than the other sections–material that was retained.

  39. ualawstudent says:

    Name: Chris
    School: University of Arizona
    Course: Constitutional Law

    Everyone has that one professor. That extraordinary professor who pushed you, helped you, and most importantly, taught you. For me, the answer is simple. Perhaps the hardest course I have taken in law school is constitutional law. This is the most political charged body of law in our entire legal system. It defines the very functions of our democratic government. It is so intense that two words, “due process”, have created enough opinions, articles, and books to fill several rooms to the ceiling. The course is already set to give you a migraine. But when you are armed with not just a good professor, but a truly great one, somehow the material ceases to float around and you gain an understanding for the flow of constitutional theory. Or at least, the reasoning starts to have at least some rational basis (queue the rimshot for the Con Law joke).

    I remember my first day in the class. In walks this notable woman, this perhaps the only way to describe her. She was formidable, a former administrator. She was intelligent, always published. She was assertive, a renowned debater. I had heard she was the best. And when she started, she said, “here we go…” From that moment on, I got lost in the magic that is constitutional law. How can Congress do this? How is it that the federal government can require all of the states to set their drinking age at 21? How can the federal government stop all manifesting of florescent lights bulbs? How does the Constitution protect your right to send your children to private schools? Illegal immigration. Healthcare. Sexual Rights. It all comes here. This is an ever-expanding subject that will push you to think and question the actions of our government. I would often go to her office hours and we would talk on and on about issues, hypotheticals, and theories.

    My experience would best classify her as a mix between Justice Cardozo and Ms. Frizzle from the Magic School Bus. She pushed me. I don’t think I have ever worked as hard for a class. Peeling through every case, and thinking about every issue. I was slightly overwhelmed, if not a little scared, in the class. But I loved every minute. I had fun. It is the class I am the most proud of. It is also one of the best professional relationships I have made in law school.

    Until the day I retire, I will remember this class and what my professor did for me.

  40. morte111 says:

    Josh Mortensen
    Washburn University
    International Business Transactions
    This teacher was an absolute joy everyday you came into class. It didn’t matter if you were just waking up or upset because nothing made sense in Evidence or Civ Pro. She brought an energy everyday that made people laugh and pay attention even over the mundane parts of class. She thoroughly enjoyed coming to class everyday and that enthusiasm made it such an enjoyable class every week.

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